Could you consume 84 grams of fibre in one day?

April 2nd, 2010 · Lisa · book review, Review · Comments

Yesterday I eluded to the fact that my diet had been lacking in some essential nutrients that are necessary for optimum health. Fibre is not one of the things I’ve been missing. I’ve heard that 30 grams is the amount most SAD (standard American diet) adherents are encouraged to strive for in their daily consumption – a number that the majority continue to be unable to meet. If you were to evaluate my diet solely on fibre content I would get an A++. Unfortunately, our bodies need a whole lot more to function than just the binding and sweeping power of our reliable friend, fibre. 


In reading Becoming Raw one of the elements that really interested me was the 6 menu plans that were provided. Each menu consists of a diversity of food sources that combined meet all of the daily requirements for vitamins and minerals with an ideal ratio of protein, fat and carbohydrates. I thought it would be enlightening to follow each of the meal plans and mentally compare my typical intake and the impact on my body as an initial assessment of where changes are required in my regular routine.


The first menu I tried did not contain any recipes, instead it lists all of the foods for the day by weight. Below is everything I ate, although the pictures do not do justice to the 11 cups of dark green veggies, or the abundance of fruit that kept me more than satiated throughout the day.

The morning started with a large bowl of canary melon.

About an hour later I had a navel orange. Once that was digested I went out for a 12km run.

When I returned I enjoyed a green smoothie full of strawberries, a banana and a good bunch of kale.

A mutsu apple provided the refreshing crunch I was craving by late morning.
At lunch I mixed up a huge bowl of greens, broccoli, an orange, almonds, sunflowers seeds, and ground flax. The vitamin C and essential fats in this meal really increase the bioavailability of the nutrients in those amazing, leafy greens.
Later… another orange.
Late afternoon snack: Pumpkin seeds, almonds, ground flax, cinnamon and a banana.
Dinner was another huge bowl of greens topped with more nuts and seeds.
As the sun set I enjoyed yet another orange and another apple.
Does that seem like a lot of food to you? According to the authors of Becoming Raw this combination equals about 1700 calories and contains approximately 84 grams of fibre and 60 grams of protein. As I mentioned above it includes all of the vitamins and minerals we require in the amounts we need (except for B12 and D – but I’ll explain that in a later post).
So, how does the menu compare to your usual fare?
At first I was overwhelmed by the quantity of food but found that my hunger reemerged every fews hours allowing me to consume the calories without ever feeling like I was forcing down another forkful. The meals digested really well and I felt energetic and happy all day.
Could you eat 11 cups of raw greens..and 84 grams of fibre in one day? Would you want to?
Are there elements of this menu that maybe missing from your diet? Following this list really demonstrated how limited my intake of healthy fats had been over the last few years. I’m now ready to celebrate flax on a daily basis.

5 Comments

  1. Posted April 2, 2010 at 10:48 pm

    Mostly that seems like an awful lot of fruit for me. . . but then again, I'm not really eating fruit these days! I am pretty used to lots of fibre, though not sure whether I'd hit 84 grams in a day! Good for you and congrats :)

  2. Posted April 2, 2010 at 11:02 pm

    I'd like to think I could eat that all in a day, but my eating habits have gotten so out of hand lately that I'm not sure I could manage that amount!

  3. Posted April 3, 2010 at 7:55 am

    I could DEFINITELY eat 11 cups of greens a day. Kale rocks me like a hurricane!

    But fruit. I have a hard time with it. If I had to eat that many oranges in a day, I might snap and start killing people. Then again, maybe I could learn to love them. I used to hate chickpeas (shocking!!) after all.

    Lately, smoothies are the best way I'm finding to get a lot of fruit. I put bananas, strawberries, blueberries, kale or spinach, DHA flax oil, cinnamon, vega oil, and unsweetened soy milk in mine. A half litre really satisfies my hunger for several hours.

  4. Posted April 3, 2010 at 10:14 pm

    Ricki,
    I have followed your progress in conquering candida. I have learned a lot from reading about your journey. I know others have really benefited from the ACD recipes you share.

    a-k,
    It was a lot more food then I was used to eating but I enjoyed using it as a way to reflect on my regular routine.

    Colleen,
    I've really learned the same thing, I can definitely get enough greens if some of them are blended into a delicious smoothie.The combo you describe sounds perfect-Brenda and Vesanto would be so proud.

  5. Posted April 4, 2010 at 8:36 am

    At first when I read this post I thought wow, that does seem like a lot of food! (And I eat A LOT so that really means something coming from me :P). But then when I re-scrolled down, I realized it didn't seem like a lot of FOOD per say, but I guess just like a lot of meals in one day.

    I think it's so amazing that all of those fruits and veggies and nuts and seeds contain 60 grams of protein! Robby keeps talking about wanting to buy some kind of protein powder like a hemp protein or vega for our post-run meals, and I keep saying no it's too expensive and I think we can meet our protein needs from real food. So, I can't wait to share this post with him.

    I was also really intrigued and impressed by how delicious you made everything even without cooking a meal or using a recipe. The bananas with cinnamon and seeds looks really delicious, as did the bowls of greens. I'm looking forward to trying those. I always have a craving for a treat after a meal and tend to reach for a row of dark chocolate, but I can see myself replacing the chocolate with that banana treat, so thank you for sharing! :)

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